Texas Golf Association, Since 1906
Texas Golf Association, Since 1906



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Doris Kallina, 1985 WTGA President (Viewed: 3218)
Posted by Stacy Dennis on September 14, 2016 @ 8:00 am

Kallina and Jack Burke Jr. - 1985 WTGA State Amateur Championship

Doris Kallina is a native Texan, born in Speaks, Texas on her family’s ranch at the junction of Jackson and Lavaca counties.  She attended several colleges in California and moved to Sugar Land in 1973 with her husband and three children.  When it became necessary to place their multiple handicapped daughter in a residential facility, Doris' friends persuaded her husband, J that she needed an outlet and convinced him that giving her a set of clubs would lead her in the right direction.  Her golfing goal was to reach a single digit handicap, but she fell just short with a twelve being the lowest handicap she achieved.  She used to compete in the WTGA State Amateur in the so-called “Director’s Flight”.
 
Doris actually got interested in the Rules of Golf before she played golf or knew the game well.  She and her husband were members at the old Canyon Creek Club in San Antonio, which is known as Sonterra today.  In the late sixties, Joe Conrad, who owned a par three course in San Antonio, had to leave town unexpectedly and with only a few days’ notice, asked Doris to substitute for him at his Junior Golf Program.  He said, “It’s easy - just teach them a few rules”.  She decided she better learn a few Rules and started studying the book and found it fascinating. She continues to be a student of the Rules of Golf today.
 
Doris first attended a USGA Rules School in 1982 and scored a ninety-seven on her first exam.  She estimates she has attended Rules School about twenty more times and her worst score on the exam was a ninety-two.  In 1985 she scored a perfect 100 on the rules exam and was at the time only the second person and first woman to ever do so.  The next year the instructor announced that she had apparently choked on her follow-up exam, as she only scored a ninety-nine!

She contends that rules officiating is not that difficult.  “You must learn to drive a golf cart at full speed while steering with your elbow and holding a Decisions book in one hand and a radio in the other.”
 


Kallina (L) and Ellen Earle - 2012 Texas Challenge

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100 Texas Women is a blog with each post featuring a different notable woman from the history of Texas golf.  You can honor these women and invest in the next 100 years of women's golf by contributing to the Breaking 100 campaign.  All proceeds benefit the TGA Foundations' Women's Initiatives.  Learn more and support the campaign here.
 

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Martha Leach, 1992 WTGA Champion (Viewed: 3468)
Posted by Stacy Dennis on September 12, 2016 @ 8:00 am

Martha Leach started playing golf at the age of 12 as an avenue for solitude.  “Being from a large family of 10 kids, I found peace”, she recalls.  Golf has always been a big part of Leach’s family life.  Her sister, Hollis Stacy, is a 3-time U.S. Women’s Open Champion and member of the World Golf Hall of Fame.  Her daughter Madison was her partner in the 2015 U.S. Women’s Four-Ball Championship.
 
Leach has deep ties to Georgia and Kentucky, and spent time in Texas between the two.  Her first tournament win was the Georgia State Girls’ Junior Championship and she played collegiate golf at the University of Georgia.  She is also a member of the Kentucky Golf Hall of Fame.  She came to Texas in 1989 and spent some great years here where she served as an Assistant Golf Coach at the University of Texas and built Austin’s Black Hawk Golf Club with her sister and husband, John. 
 
During her time in the Lone Star state, she left her mark on amateur golf, and in 1992 she left her name on the WTGA State Amateur Championship trophy.  Her championship victory at Barton Creek Resort is a bittersweet memory for Leach.  She recalls the championship being played soon after the untimely death of a dear friend.  “Monica Welch loved golf and she loved the state of Texas. We played a lot of golf together and she would always talk about the beautiful golden days of Texas. In my final round, I wore a pair of her golf shoes even though they were 1/2 too small. She would have been proud of me.”
 
Leach has been a force in amateur golf since her teenage years.  She has played in USGA Championships in five different decades and claimed the 2009 U.S. Women’s Mid-Amateur Championship.  She has played in a record 27 Mid-Am championships and qualified for match play all but once.  She considers her longevity in playing competitive golf to be her greatest golfing accomplishment.  As a testament, she is again in a national championship field this week at the Women’s Mid-Amateur in Erie, Pennsylvania and will certainly be counted among the top contenders.  Of her career spent in golf, she says, “I have to admit I have fallen in and out of love with golf millions of times but I know golf has been good to me. The game owes me nothing. I have met wonderful people through the journey of my golfing career.”
 


100 Texas Women is a blog with each post featuring a different notable woman from the history of Texas golf.  You can honor these women and invest in the next 100 years of women's golf by contributing to the Breaking 100 campaign.  All proceeds benefit the TGA Foundations' Women's Initiatives.  Learn more and support the campaign here.
 

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Sandra Palmer - 1975 US Women's Open Champion (Viewed: 4470)
Posted by Stacy Dennis on September 9, 2016 @ 8:00 am

Sandra Palmer is one of a remarkable number of all-time Texas greats to hail from Fort Worth.  Standards are fairly high when your local competition includes Aniela Goldthwaite, Polly Riley, Sandra Haynie and Marty Leonard, but Palmer acquitted herself very nicely over her career and added her name along with these others to the long list of Fort Worth representatives to the Texas Golf Hall of Fame.

Although Sandra grew up in Maine, she returned to Texas to attend college at North Texas State, where she was not only a champion golfer, but also a cheerleader and homecoming queen.  On her way to a quarter-final match at the 1962 WTGA State Championship, she told the Fort Worth Press, “I only play during the summer.  During the winter, I just give up golf…too many activities and school.”  Even with her busy schedule, she was able to fill her summers with great golfing success – she was a four-time winner of the Women’s West Texas Amateur and a finalist in the Women’s Intercollegiate Championship.  She played in her first WTGA State Amateur Championship in 1959, and won the first flight as she watched her good friend Sandra Haynie win the championship.  She reached the Championship flight in 1961 and 1962 before winning her own title in 1963.

Palmer turned pro in 1964 and went on to win 17 LPGA titles and two major championships including the 1975 US Women’s Open.  She earned her US Open title by finishing four-shots ahead of Nancy Lopez and the rest of the field, and her win ensured the trophy would stay among Texans for another year – it had been with Haynie in 1974!  She almost defended her title in 1976, losing in an 18-hole playoff to JoAnne Carner.  She was the LPGA Player of the year in 1975 and finished in the top ten on the LPGA official money list for 10 consecutive years.  She was inducted into the Texas Golf Hall of Fame in 1985 and is a Class A Member of the LPGA Teaching and Club Pro Division.

Palmer now resides in California, but will always be remembered in the Texas golf community as one of “ours”.  In celebration of the 100th anniversary of the founding of the Women’s Texas Golf Association, Palmer will join her Texas peers Sandra Haynie, Carol Mann, Judy Rankin and Kathy Whitworth on the Breaking 100 Gala panel.  This collection of Texas’ greatest golfers will share an evening and share stories of their remarkable careers with golf fans and supporters on November 1 at Houston Country Club.  Click here to see a preview of the event.  Click here to purchase a ticket and join the celebration.


100 Texas Women is a blog with each post featuring a different notable woman from the history of Texas golf.  You can honor these women and invest in the next 100 years of women's golf by contributing to the Breaking 100 campaign.  All proceeds benefit the TGA Foundations' Women's Initiatives.  Learn more and support the campaign here.
 

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Anna Bland Thompson Stripling - 1953 WTGA Finalist (Viewed: 3046)
Posted by Stacy Dennis on September 7, 2016 @ 8:00 am


Anna Bland Thompson Stripling (L) with daughter and mother Bea Thompson (R)

Anna Bland Thompson Stripling can claim some of the greatest family connections in the 100-year history of the Women’s Texas Golf Association.  Her mother, Bea Thomson was a co-founder of the WTGA in 1916, a long-time WTGA State Amateur Championship contender, and 1917 State Amateur finalist.  Her grandmother, Laura Hewing Lewis was the 1901 Massachusetts Amateur Champion.  Her husband’s family included charter members of Anna Bland’s home club, River Crest Country Club in Fort Worth.

Even with all of that history behind her, Anna Bland made her very own name and place among the best Texas players.  She matched her mother’s appearance in the WTGA State Amateur Championship finals in 1953, and served as President of the WTGA in 1954-1955.  She won the Fort Worth City Championship seven times and claimed medalist honors at the 1962 Women’s Southern Amateur Championship.

While she was very well-known as a great golfer and advocate for the game, Stripling was also especially noted for enjoying herself.  In her book documenting the history of River Crest Country Club (River Crest Country Club:  The First 100 Years), author Hollace Ava Weiner reports, “Anna Bland Thompson Stripling always had fun.  So did everyone else in her foursome.  Whether wisecracking about a tricky bunker shot, comically adjusting her girdle after her drive, or winning a hand of gin rummy between rounds of golf, Anna Bland was full of surprises and spontaneity”.  Even Anna Bland’s mother took note of her affinity for gin rummy.  Mrs. Thompson once joked, “That girl is the best gin rummy player in the state.  She should spend more time on her golf.”

100 Texas Women is a blog with each post featuring a different notable woman from the history of Texas golf.  You can honor these women and invest in the next 100 years of women's golf by contributing to the Breaking 100 campaign.  All proceeds benefit the TGA Foundations' Women's Initiatives.  Learn more and support the campaign here.

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Carol Barrett, 1985-1986 WTGA Senior Medalist (Viewed: 3468)
Posted by Stacy Dennis on September 2, 2016 @ 8:00 am

Carol Barrett’s name is not engraved on the Spring Lake trophy, but it is etched in the hearts and minds of her friends and golfing rivals as one of the fine players of her day, and a player everyone enjoyed.  It would be a great challenge to find a picture of Barrett over her thirty-plus years of playing where she and whomever she is pictured with are not both smiling.
 
Her competitive record, however, is nothing to laugh at.  She entered the ranks of “contenders” by reaching the semi-finals in the 1960 WTGA State Amateur Championship before failing to all-time great and dear friend, Martha Mahan.  She defeated another Texas legend, Wanda Hendrix, in 1966 to reach the final match before falling to nine-time champion Mary Ann Morrison.  In 1967, she finished one shot off the medalist pace under blustery conditions in Lubbock and commented, “Back home [in San Antonio] when the wind is this high, we play gin rummy, not golf!”  She would continue to play well for another twenty years, earning Senior Medalist honors in 1985 and again in 1986 when she also reached the quarterfinals.
 
Barrett is a five-time winner of the San Antonio City Championship and she and her dear friend Juanita “Thunder” Jones won more Amarillo Invitational titles than she can remember.  She claimed the Club Championship at San Antonio Country Club 19 times.  In 1975, she set the course record with a 67 at Riverside Golf Club in San Antonio, and repeated the feat exactly ten years later at historic Brackenridge Park Golf Course.
 
Barrett fondly recalls a trip taken with a group of friends and LPGA Founder and Hall of Fame member Marilynn Smith.  “Oh, what fun we had!” she recalls as she recounted playing 10 courses in 11 days in Scotland.  From all accounts, it seems any time spent with Barrett would surely be fun.

 
100 Texas Women is a blog with each post featuring a different notable woman from the history of Texas golf.  You can honor these women and invest in the next 100 years of women's golf by contributing to the Breaking 100 campaign.  All proceeds benefit the TGA Foundations' Women's Initiatives.  Learn more and support the campaign here.
 

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