Texas Golf Association, Since 1906
Texas Golf Association, Since 1906



Golf with Texas Women
Previous Page 7 of 24 Next PageLast Page
Rosa Gernand, 2-time WTGA Champion (Viewed: 1884)
Posted by Stacy Dennis on September 1, 2016 @ 8:00 am

In one of Texas golf’s most competitive eras, Rosa Gernand’s play was a cut above.  She won her City Championship when she resided in both Corpus Christi and Beaumont.  She won the WTGA State Amateur Championship in back to back years (1957 and 1958).  To reach the final match both years, she had to face all-time championship record holder Mary Ann Morrison.  In 1960, she also won the amateur division of the Babe Didrickson Zaharias Open.
 
Despite her consistently excellent play, Gernand was generally considered humble and unassuming.  Describing her rematch against Morrison in the semi-final match in 1958, Gernand said, “Oh my!  I never thought I could beat her again. I just didn’t think I could.”  Morrison had a different opinion after falling on the third extra hole.  After her extra-hole loss, Morrison told Mrs. Grant Messenger, Gernand’s opponent in the upcoming finals match, “You get the fighter now.”
 
She clearly possessed a fighting spirit and determined will, but in scrolling through 100 years of history in the WTGA scrapbooks, there are few players whose smiles stand out more than Gernand’s.  Asked about Gernand, Carol Barrett, a frequent championship opponent remembers, “Oh, she was such a fine lady.  And so much fun!”


100 Texas Women is a blog with each post featuring a different notable woman from the history of Texas golf.  You can honor these women and invest in the next 100 years of women's golf by contributing to the Breaking 100 campaign.  All proceeds benefit the TGA Foundations' Women's Initiatives.  Learn more and support the campaign here.
 

Post Comment
Mary Beth Morgan Covey, 1978 WTGA Champion (Viewed: 2124)
Posted by Stacy Dennis on August 31, 2016 @ 8:00 am

Mary Beth Morgan Covey first entered the WTGA State Amateur Championship in 1972.  She was the reigning Texas State Junior Champion at the time and made an immediate impression.  Cover qualified for the championship flight and advance to the quarter-finals before bowing out to 1967 US Women’s Amateur Champion Mary Lou Dill.  Covey, who grew up in the Houston area, went to college at Houston Baptist University before there was a golf team on which to compete.  However, she quickly set about changing that.  “When Mary Beth went to HBU in 1973, she was on a grant-in-aid," Skelly said. "She talked to the school president who played golf and he was very interested in getting a women's athletic program started. She did a good job in getting the program started and in recruiting." – Debbie Skelly, 1975
 
The team that Covey helped formed would go on to include four future WTGA State Amateur Champions – herself (1978), Skelly (1975), Linda Hunt (1980), Connie McCain (1984) and 5-time champion Toni Wiesner.  HBU would also produce two All-Americans (Stephanie Farwig, Caroline Pierce) and countless notable names in Texas golf (Peggy Gustafson, Nancy Ballard, Jessica Supernaw Durbin, Kelley Makette Nittoli, Karen Schmidt Murphy) and many more.  Covey was inducted into the HBU Athletics Hall of Honor in 2010.
 
But Covey’s impact on Texas golf extended well beyond collegiate golf.  Beginning with her first WTGA entry in 1970, she sustained a top-level amateur career and was a Championship contender for many years to come.  Covey won the WTGA State Amateur Championship over Curtis Cup member Brenda Goldsmith Hocott in 1978 and reached the WTGA finals in 1976, 1979 and 1985.


Wanda Hendrix (L) and Mary Beth Covey (R)
 

100 Texas Women is a blog with each post featuring a different notable woman from the history of Texas golf.  You can honor these women and invest in the next 100 years of women's golf by contributing to the Breaking 100 campaign.  All proceeds benefit the TGA Foundations' Women's Initiatives.  Learn more and support the campaign here.
 

Post Comment
Bertha (Mrs.R.L.) Bowen - World's greatest friend of golf (Viewed: 2062)
Posted by Stacy Dennis on August 25, 2016 @ 8:00 am

Aniela Gorczyca Goldthwaite (L) and Bertha Bowen (R)

“Texas has been truly fortunate in having so many outstanding women golfers. Names that come to mind immediately are: the one and only "Babe” Didrikson Zaharias, Betty Jameson, Betsy Rawls, Aniela Gorczyca Goldthwaite and Polly Riley. But there have been others, not champions, who have worked through the years to promote women's golf and have helped produce our champions.  One of these is Bertha (Mrs. R. L.) Bowen of Fort Worth.” – Frances Cartlidge, The Lady Golfer, March 1969
 
Bowen and her husband moved to Ft. Worth from El Paso in 1930 and she took up golf at Meadowbrook Country Club.  While taking lessons at the club, she met young Aniela Gorczyca (later Goldthwaite).  As Goldthwaite became a dominant force in Texas and American amateur golf, Bowen was often at her side, accompanying her young friend to championships all across the country.  Goldthwaite won three WTGA State Amateur Championships, twice represented the United States in Curtis Cup matches, was the Curtis Cup Captain and served as the Chair of the USGA Women’s Committee.  Bowen is also well-known as the dearest friend of “Babe” Zaharias.  Babe described Bowen’s as “like godparents to me”.  After Babe won the 1946 US Women’s Amateur Championship, she promptly returned to Fort Worth and placed her trophy on the Bowen’s mantle.  Babe recovered from her first major cancer surgery at the Bowen’s Fort Worth home, and her battle with the disease prompted their service to the Babe Zaharias Cancer Fund.

Service to others was a way of life for Bowen.  During World War II, she served as a volunteer for the local chapter of the Red Cross and distinguished herself as a civilian social worker.  She volunteered in service to golf almost from her first day playing.  Over her career, she would serve as a Director and Officer for the WTGA and as President for the Texas Senior Women’s Association.  She joined the USGA Senior Womens Committee and was instrumental in bringing the 1969 US Senior Women’s Amateur Championship to Fort Worth.  Bowen is remembered as a great friend of golf and just generally a great friend. Fittingly, she is also remembered each year by the WTGA Senior Medalist, who is awarded the Cartlidge-Bowen trophy acknowledging her great contribution to Texas golf.

“Golf is my idea of true sportsmanship. It has made such a rich contribution to my life, I want to continue to do anything I can to promote golf and to help others enjoy the game as I have all these years". -  Bertha Bowen
100 Texas Women is a blog with each post featuring a different notable woman from the history of Texas golf.  You can honor these women and invest in the next 100 years of women's golf by contributing to the Breaking 100 campaign.  All proceeds benefit the TGA Foundations' Women's Initiatives.  Learn more and support the campaign here.
 

Post Comment
Betty Dodd (Viewed: 2670)
Posted by Stacy Dennis on August 23, 2016 @ 8:00 am

Betty Dodd was known for her fiery red hair and booming drives.  Dodd was a San Antonio City Champion and first participated in the WTGA State Amateur Championship as a 16-year old in 1948.  She was eliminated by eventual champion and future LPGA co-founder, Bettye Danoff.  In 1949, she won the long-drive competition and reached the semi-finals before losing to another future pro, Betty MacKinnon.  In 1950, Dodd reached the quarterfinals where she unsuccessfully faced future World Golf Hall of Fame member Betsy Rawls.  The following year, in 1951, she earned medalist honors and reached the final match.  For the first time since the tournament began in 1916, the 36-hole final was all square at the end of the match.  Extra holes were required before Dodd lost to Texas Golf Hall of Fame member Polly Riley on the 37th hole.

Dodd turned pro and went on to win three professional titles including the 1951 Hollywood Four-Ball playing with Betsy Rawls.  She continued as a teaching pro in the San Antonio area for many years and had a notable impact on many great players including 1975 WTGA Champion Debbie Skelly and LPGA standout Wendy Ward among countless others.



Early Texans on the LPGA Tour:  Betty Jameson, Lesbia Lobo, Betty Dodd, "Babe" Didrckson Zaharias

Sign up to receive email notifications of new blog posts.

100 Texas Women is a blog with each post featuring a different notable woman from the history of Texas golf.  You can honor these women and invest in the next 100 years of women's golf by contributing to the Breaking 100 campaign.  All proceeds benefit the TGA Foundations' Women's Initiatives.  Learn more and support the campaign here.
 

Post Comment
Kelli Kuehne - 3 Consecutive USGA Titles (Viewed: 2605)
Posted by Stacy Dennis on August 19, 2016 @ 8:00 am

“I am a Texas Girl…that’s the only way I know to say it.” – Kelli Kuehne
 
There are few people who have more Texas bona fides than Kelli Kuehne.  The Dallas native won four consecutive Texas High School Championships and went on to an All-American career at the University of Texas.  Along the way, she won three consecutive USGA National titles – the 1994 U.S. Junior Girls’ Championship and 1995 and 1996 U.S. Women’s Amateur.  She represented the United States on the 1996 Curtis Cup Team and is a member of the Texas Sports Hall of Fame.
 
After a remarkable amateur career, Kuehne joined the LPGA tour in 1998, where she competed for 13 years and won the 1999 LPGA Corning Classic.  She also represented the United States on the 2003 and 2003 Curtis Cup teams.  Kuehne retired from professional golf in 2010, but has continued to contribute to the game as an entrepreneur, TV commentator and instructor.  She was a co-owner of PlayKleen towels, and serves as a consultant for Tino’s Golf.  She has served as a television commentator for the U.S. Women’s Amateur, U.S. Junior Girls’ and the Golf Channel’s LPGA tour coverage.  She is currently a full-time teaching professional at Lantana Golf Club in Lantana and is working to pass along her competitive experience and success in a variety of arenas to the next generation.
 
Kuehne is also widely known for her generous advocacy for charitable causes.  She is the National Spokesperson for the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation and has also served as the Tournament Director Cristi Kerr’s Birdies for Breast Cancer Tournament.  “I see it as my responsibility to educate and promote awareness for people living with Diabetes.  I also feel it is my greatest responsibility to give back. To pass it on…it’s the least I can do.”  For more information about Kuehne and her many activities, visit her website at http://www.kellikuehne.com/.


Kelli Kuehne (Back left) - 1996 Curtis Cup Team (Photo courtesy USGA)

Sign up to receive email notifications of new blog posts.

100 Texas Women is a blog with each post featuring a different notable woman from the history of Texas golf.  You can honor these women and invest in the next 100 years of women's golf by contributing to the Breaking 100 campaign.  All proceeds benefit the TGA Foundations' Women's Initiatives.  Learn more and support the campaign here.

 

Post Comment
Previous Page 7 of 24 Next PageLast Page
Breaking 100
Women's Home
Subscribe to the Blog
Stay Connected
TGA Disaster Relief